10 Words You’re Probably Misusing

While browsing the internet earlier this week, I came across this post on 10 words you’ve probably been misusing.

I thought it would be useful for a weekly writing tip, since as writers we need to know what words mean. So, instead of plagiarism, I will simply leave you with the list of words (below) and recommend you go over and check out the original post for definitions!

1) Travesty

2) Ironic [Check back next week for a Friday writing tip featuring the word ironic complete with an example of true irony!]

3) Peruse

4) Bemused

5) Compelled

6) Nauseous

7) Conversate

8) Redundant

9) Enormity

10) Terrific

Sadly, I have used each of these incorrectly at one point or another. This list is a great example of why we need to know what words mean before we use them.

Have you used any of these words incorrectly before?

Do you have any often misused words to add to this list?

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6 thoughts on “10 Words You’re Probably Misusing

  1. I have used “peruse” wrong so many times, it’s not even funny. Good to know about “nauseous” I don’t want to be nauseous. Is it just me or is that one of the weirdest spellings?

  2. Mind = blown. I do not like this. I needed to read it, but I do not like it at all. That’s it. I’m going to just look up every single word before I use it ever again. Lol.

  3. Be sure to check out the replies to the original discussion, or, better yet, check a dictionary before changing the way you use many of these words. In some cases, the “misuses” are actually third or fourth definitions in the dictionary. In a couple cases, I believe the original author was just wrong. As writers and editors, we need to check all the meanings and usages of a word before rejecting it as a misuse.

    • That’s a great point, and I appreciate you leaving your feedback. This is something I should have looked into further in the original article and also added to this post. Certainly we should all–editors and writers alike–make sure we don’t take anything at face value. Whether it’s spell check or a list of words like I have here, it’s important to make sure we know what words we’re using and what they mean, especially in context. A helpful reminder!

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